Sunday, July 8, 2012

Moonrise Kingdom


Moonrise Kingdom
Like most kids, I once tried to run away from home, though for me, I’m afraid it involved a rather poorly hatched plan that seemed to dwindle in importance as the day wore on, so much so that by the time night fell, I was too sleepy to carry it out and completely forgot the desk chair that I had placed beneath my bedroom window to better facilitate my midnight escape.  Over breakfast the next morning I caught a glimpse of my father coming across the back garden with the chair in his arms and a bemused expression on his face.  We never mentioned the incident and I’m afraid I never seriously entertained the idea of running away again.  But for those few brief moments the afternoon I considered it, the whole idea seemed totally within the realm of possibility.  I could, if I chose to, run away to an island where I could eat ice cream, stay up as late as I wished, never have to go to Sunday School and have sheep for pets.  It made perfect sense to me. Such is the wonder of childhood.
There is a simple reason that children love fairy tales.  It is easy for them to believe they are true.  Trolls under bridges, carpets that fly.  Witches that eat you, bears that can talk.  All these plot lines seem perfectly plausible to a child.  If their life feels restricted or too black and white, they can seriously plan their escape.  With an old suitcase packed with essentials - books and records, a stuffed animal, a kitten - they consider their options carefully.  The circus, the fair, the beach or the lake - any of these places could work out just fine.  A child’s sense of grand possibility, limited only by individual imagination, has less to do with innocence than it does with a certain quirk of intelligence, a crinkle of thought that opens the door to fantasy and, for a few fortunate souls, allows it to remain ajar well past adulthood.
I was reminded of my childhood this past week when I watched the new Wes Anderson film, Moonrise Kingdom.  Decidedly quirky, it is a movie best enjoyed by someone who well remembers what it felt like to be a child.  The light is golden, adults are strange, binoculars give you magic powers, and true love is, well, true.  For someone like myself, for whom the door into fantasy has never closed a fraction, it was an utter treat. It is incredibly funny and, with a soundtrack that features Francoise Hardy, Hank Williams and Benjamin Britten, it proved the perfect way to spend two hours on a hot, hot day. 




See the trailer HERE.

25 comments:

  1. I saw it too last Monday and loved it. It was like a fairytale. It totally captured the feelings of childhood. I love all Wes Anderson films but this one was perfection. The scenes of them all inside on a rainy day..were especially favorite to me. It did give me the feeling of being a kid again. It was beautiful to look at too. I just loved it so did my Mom.

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  2. YAY--this has been on my radar for over two weeks now and I will likely treat myself to the (oh so occasional) movie this weekend. How delicious is your memoir, and the tasty tidbits within. As always you deliver quality material to your faithful readers.

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  3. A must see. My door too has stayed wide open. Beautifully written as always Pamela.

    Do languish in the shade with a tinkling glass of iced tea, with Edward and Apple of course.

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  4. We saw it when it first came out and I can honestly say it was my favorite Wes Anderson film probably because it did remind me of childhood. I never thought about running away but this is how I would have imagined it if it were the case. Such a fun film.
    Karen

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  5. Hello Pamela

    I loved reading about your escape plan as a child. I did leave home when I was 6 yrs old. We lived on a farm in Ireland and within a copse of trees and bramble bushes I had a little lair or den. I neglected to take any food with me and felt I could live on berries. My carry all bag was an empty package from "Joy of Home" tea and within were my seven ribbons one for each day. I hit in my den for most of the day and you can imagine my disappointment that no one came looking for me, so I ambled home around 7 p.m. I believe my parents knew where I was and never asked any questions.

    You have me enthused about this movie and we plan on seeing it this weekend. I love the light in the movie.

    Helen xx

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  6. Pamela, I loved this movie! You are so right, it is about what it is like to be a child. Great post!

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  7. OH yes! We all at our house agree! And how funny-- our second full day without power, due to a storm of all things, and our second afternoon spent in the movie theatre TRYing to get cool is how we ended up in Moonrise Kingdom-- EACH of us feeling like, somehow, this film was tailor made just for us, and feeling a tad sheepishly guilty that "too bad the others won't be enjoying this the way I am!" Only to find out that we EACH love love loved it. To bits!

    And to it's credit, I've never before seen when the credits role, and we wait and watch each time, a separate credit, not to mention a VISUAL for book jacket art in a film! Weren't those just the best book jackets? They both sent me back further into childhood and made we crave a chance at reading them! Beyond their excerpts, that is.

    Your blog has that magical enchanting quality, too. It keeps us coming back. I hope you are doing quite well!

    : )

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  8. I never ran away as a child....I'm too much of a fear-based individual but I saw the movie last week and loved it. I loved how two quirky, lonely children found each other and at the same time helped bring a community together. And I laughed at so many things throughout the whole movie. Now I'm waiting for To Rome With Love....starts tomorrow!

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  9. Pamela I am so excited to see this movie! As a child I did lose myself in reading and mysteries...

    xoxo
    Karena
    Art by Karena

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  10. I've not heard of this film before now but it sounds right up my street. Hope they will release it here!

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  11. It is a great movie which totally captured the feelings of childhood. - Herman Swan

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  12. Loved the movie.

    Saw it mentioned on another blog last week. Had to go.

    Garden & Be Well, XO Tara

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  13. Just the sort of escapist film we could do with over here at the moment with our bad weather Pamela.

    Do you read the Alexander McCall Smith 44 Scotland Street novels? Bertie is just such a lovely little boy and has these wonderful ideas too.

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  14. Oh Pamela, I can't wait to see that movie. I still think of you as a child.

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  15. Beautifully stated! Looks like an interesting movie!

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  16. haha, at last a movie worth my ticket purchase:)

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  17. Another delicious post Pamela.

    I agree, the door into fantasy should always be left open, so long as the Opossums don't get in.

    I am making a note of Moonrise kingdom for my watch list.

    I thought of you last week whilst on a little trip we took, driving through mountainous and hilly terrain S produced the soundtrack to the movie The Descendants. Mountains and Hawaiian music who would have thought, now I'm hooked.

    Paul

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  18. i am currently 67 going on 12.
    that sounds weird to say out loud.
    but you said it for me as you so eloquently always do...
    12 was a very good year for me.
    and i find that no matter how wise or old we are or think we are... there's always that wonderful 12 year old trying to get out!
    will see moonrise kingdom this weekend. thanks!!!

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  19. My favourite film maker. Cannot wait to see it!

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  20. i love that you wanted a sheep as a pet!!.....a million years ago i was married to a shepherd and we had orphan lamb who was a pet....she was called Podge and came when she was called and eventually joined the flock and had her own lambs but if she saw you on the hill she would break away from the flock and come and say hello!!...thanks for bringing back that memory for me Pamela...xx

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  21. Loved, loved, loved this movie. I had no idea what to expect, and was delightfully surprised. As soon as it finished my friends, husband and I were all ready to see it again. I don't know when was the last time that happened. I also was the same age as the characters in 1965 which gave it a certain poignancy.

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  22. Oh yes, I'm looking forward to seeing this film!

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  23. I've been waiting to read your post until I saw Moonrise Kingdom, which I did today. I loved it as did my 15-year-old daughter and her friend. I loved your vision of the ideal get away and I agree with your reaction to this marvelous movie. Part of the reason I'm writing for teens is that books are so key to readers of that age and true love and adventure can go hand in hand. The girl's suitcase full of books made me fall for her.

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  24. I saw it too and reviewed it as part of my summer film awards. Did you find it very Peter Pan? I did.

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  25. Mary Lou BethuneJuly 24, 2012 at 9:58 PM

    It made me feel like I was back in 1965 or so but in Clemson, SC. The atmosphere was the same, however, and I think he read To Kill a Mockingbird recently as well. The innocence... Anderson even got the color/hues right. I loved it. It was a fairy tale that turned out happily for the children.

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I love to read your comments! Each and every one! Though I'm always reading your comments, I may not respond in the comment section. If you want to write me directly, you may do so at pamela@pamelaterry.net. Thank you for reading!